Slidell Square

Although the land was surveyed and sold in 1854, Slidell was not established until thirty years later. Early settlers witnessed the depredations of horse thieves, warring bands of Comanche Indians, and outlaws such as Sam Bass, who frequently hid out two miles northwest of Slidell at Cove Hollow. Between 1867 and 1887 thousands of cattle moved slowly through the region following the Chisholm Trail northward to markets in Kansas. During the same period various small communities used the site of present Slidell, then called Hackberry Grove, as a meeting place for picnics and revivals.


Slidell Cemetery & High School

 

In 1884 a post office and several businesses operating within the area were moved to lots on Hickory Creek donated by local landowners. Since most of the original settlers were southerners they named their new community in honor of John Slidell, a Confederate diplomat. The town served as a supply and service center for neighboring farmers and ranchers; its population never exceeded 275 inhabitants. By the early twentieth century Slidell had a cotton gin, a local telephone exchange, and a weekly newspaper, the Courier. The Slidell school district expanded over the years to include rural communities in three counties.

 

After 1911, when a fire destroyed two businesses, and the coming of the automobile, the town declined as a trading center. By 1944 even the barber had left. In 1985 the post office and 175 inhabitants remained.

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2004 - 2015, Wise County
All Rights Reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without permission
Wise County Information Technology
webmaster@co.wise.tx.us

Employee Email

This site uses frames. Click here if you linked directly to this page from a search engine.